What Stanfield Is Reading & Watching: June 2015 Edition

VideoModeling At Its Finest!

“But Linda, honey. Listen to me…”

Some things just never get old! We still enjoy watching this video at the JSC office! Not only is it absolutely adorable, but this little fella really knows how to model behavior, which is something we like to incorporate into our video curricula.

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Survey Shows Social Emotional Learning (SEL) On The Rise!

social emotional learning is important for teachers

SEL has established its importance in the eyes of 500 + teachers and school based administrators who recently took part in an Education Week Research Center survey. We’re happy to share that nearly 70% of the respondents believe that social and emotional learning is “very important” to student achievement!

As the Specialists in Special Education, it’s a great feeling knowing that educators are recognizing the importance behind social and emotional learning. Though academics are  important, non-academic skills, such as SEL, are crucial in fostering social skills and preparing students for success and independent living. More and more evidence reflects the need to allow students to develop as people and not just as students. Thus, implementing social and emotional learning is key when it comes to managing emotions, relationships, and decision-making.

Though this is all great news, the survey also suggested that there are still many schools who pay “too little attention to social and emotional learning. More than two thirds indicated they had had some training in social and emotional learning and that they wanted more. In responding to an open-ended question about their greatest social and emotional learning challenges, roughly one in three respondents lamented that other things took priority, leaving limited time for social and emotional learning.”

Hopefully, educators and schools will find effective strategies to use to improve students’ social and emotional learning soon!

To see more results from this survey, click here!

Source: Education Week

At Stanfield, we believe that for students with special needs, social skills are a better predictor of success in life than academic achievement. Consequently, our programs integrate VideoModeling and Social Emotional Learning (SEL). Our programs teach students SEL skills, such as the ability to recognize how another person is feeling and how to moderate their emotional response in difficult situations.

Here are a couple of our blog posts that mention SEL:

Why Emotional Intelligence Is As Important As Counting To 10

SEL: How Social & Emotional Learning Helps Special Needs Students

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“No Problem” vs. “You’re Welcome”

Etiquette & Manners For Your Teens

Imagine this: you’re at your favorite coffee shop, waiting in line, ready to jump start your day with an iced vanilla chai tea. After waiting for 10 minutes, you thank your barista for your yummy vanilla chai and she responds by saying “no problem.” What? I just thanked her for her service and generosity after waiting 10 minutes to get my drink, but in reality my order was some sort of “problem” for her?

When’s the last time you let out a “no problem” as an expression of the word thanks?

NPR does a good job of teaching us the correct and incorrect way of using the ever so popular phrase, “no problem.”

“The phrase “no problem” has always struck me as a fine way to respond to an apology. It is friendly to say to a person who has interrupted you, or cut you off, or woken you up, or missed an appointment, that the problem they caused you is no problem. By minimizing the wrong done — by saying that it was no problem — you both acknowledge the apology and express forgiveness. Perfect.

To my ear, though, “no problem” is absolutely the wrong way to reply to an expression of thanks — for the simple reason that saying “thank you” isn’t, or shouldn’t be, a veiled way of making an apology.

Saying “no problem” in place of “you’re welcome” always strikes me as self-defeating. I thank you for your service, or your gesture, or your generosity, or you kindness. So why are you even mentioning problems?”

Read the rest of the article, here!

Source: NPR

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Motivational Monday

Chester's Motivational Monday Quote

A little dose of motivation for your Monday morning! Don’t let life pass you by without doing something you love.

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Music Isn’t Just A Universal Language, It’s A Universal Remedy

Music Helps Ease Pain For Students

One Direction and Taylor Swift are easing more than just emotion pain these days!

A recent study shows that listening to music can also ease physical pain that a child or teen may have undergone. According to this study, children who choose their own music or audio book to listen to after a major procedure (like surgery) experience less pain.

“The findings suggest that doctors may be able to use less pain medication for their pediatric patients. And that’s a good thing… as children don’t tolerate such medication as well as adults.”

Read more about this study here!

Source: NPR

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Motivational Monday

Chester's Motivational Quote

A little friendly Monday message from Chester! A lot of the time; guidance, sympathy, and empathy go far more than just academics.

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Legal Smoking Age In California To Increase Soon!

Smoking Age Increases For Teens

Good news California! Since life-long smoking habits often root among the young, new legislation in CA is trying to ensure that many of the state’s younger residents don’t pick up smoking as a habit.

Earlier this month, California’s Senate approved a bill that would increase the age at which people can buy cigarettes from 18 to 21, meaning that we can expect to see less teens with a cigarette in their hands in the near future.

Read the full story from The Economist, here!

Source: The Economist

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Everything But Water: Most Kids/Teens Don’t Drink Enough Water

Young little boy refusing to drink water

A new study shows that most American children and teenagers (between the ages of 6-19) are not getting enough fluid intake. Children and teens should be consuming two to three quarts of water a day! Consequently, many kids between the ages of 6-19 suffer from mild dehydration.

The researchers stated that: “This doesn’t mean we’re saying kids are dropping like flies or that they’re very seriously dehydrated and need to go to the hospital or anything like that,” Kenney says. But even mild dehydration can affect children’s fatigue levels, mood and their ability to learn, she says.”

Read more about this story here!

Source: NPR

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Motivational Monday

Chester's Motivational Monday- June 2015

Chester shares some wise words with us on today’s edition of Motivational Monday! Don’t give up on yourself or your dreams if things get a little rocky.

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Friday’s Food For Thought

The Real Meaning Of Equality & Justice

Food for thought…

There’s always speculation about equality and justice. This image does a great job of showing us the difference.

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Free/Reduced Lunch For Kids, Even In The Summer!

Free & Reduced Lunch For Kids This Summer

Nearly 21 million students eat free or reduced meals throughout the school year, but getting those same kids/students fed during the summer isn’t an easy task. So when school gets out for the summer, grocery bills increase for parents all over the nation.

Except that now, more kids are getting the opportunity to have the cafeteria come to them during summer! “The Chow Bus”, also known as a cafeteria-on-wheels concept, is getting more funding.

“Nearly $500 million was spent nationwide on the program last summer, and the USDA expects to increase that figure if it meets its goal of providing 200 million meals this summer… This cafeteria-on-wheels concept is something schools around the country are trying out, though each has its own spin on the idea.”

Read more about The Chow Bus & how different school districts have implemented in concept of The Chow Bus for their students/kids here!

Source: NPR

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Fifth Grade Boys Make A Difference!

Boys Showing Anti Bullying Tactics

Today we’re featuring an absolutely wonderful story about 5 students at Franklin Elementary who deserve honor and recognition for their bullying prevention efforts.

The 5 boys don’t understand why people pick on someone who has special needs? So when they saw fellow classmate, James, getting teased and bullied on the playground, they decided to invite James to their table. They befriended James and since then have shown nothing but kindness to him. When the boys learned that James didn’t have a father or father figure to throw a ball with, the boys were glad to take on that role. They even used their own money to buy James a game console so he could play video games with them. They boys were recently honored with the Spirit of Youth Award for their kindness, but state that they don’t need the recognition because “[James] is an awesome kid to hang out with!”

Read the full story here!

Way to make Chester proud boys! You boys definition know how to BeCOOL and show us anti-bullying tactics!

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Motivational Monday

Chester's Motivational Monday June, 2015

A little dose of motivation for your Monday morning! Don’t give up when life gets a little messy, everything happens for a reason, & great things are always ahead!


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