Transitions® and Autism: Why it Works

Louise Fulton, Ed.D and Rebecca Silva, Ph.D

Transition from school to adulthood can be a difficult time for any student who leaves school without a plan and the experience and skill-set to carry out that plan. For students with autism, leaving school can be even more problematic, especially if they have not had the benefit of intentional preparation such as that offered through the Transitions® Curriculum

The incidence of autism has increased to 1 in 88 (CDC, 2001) creating an urgent need to find the best way to prepare students for the world of work and adult life. In addition, students with autism are now completing school and moving into adulthood in larger numbers than ever before (Sandifer, 2002). Even though they may have earned an academic diploma, students often lack the transition skills needed for the adult roles they will be facing. The good news is that although students with autism are being identified in greater numbers than before, they are also being identified earlier, their difficulties are more detectable, and many of them can be remediated.

Autism has long been characterized by deficits in communication, poor social skills and stereotyped behavior. This triad is sometimes referred to as “the big three” (DSM-IV, 2000; Wing & Gould, 1979). Functioning successfully as an adult requires an ability to communicate effectively, handle complex social situations and adjust easily to unexpected changes in the workplace and community. Experts in the field of autism note the daily inability to relate to other people or confront environmental inconsistencies. Lee and Carter (2012) confirm that the social-related challenges faced by youth with autism have a particular impact on employment prospects. Without opportunities to learn and practice appropriate social skills in reality -based community settings before leaving school, students are put at a great disadvantage. These are needs that must be addressed long before the student leaves school (National Research Council, 2001). Interventions are available which specifically target these social deficits and challenges.

The Transitions® Curriculum helps students on the autism spectrum by providing consistent and intentional lessons that are a step-by-step guide for acquiring skills needed in the post- school community. Transitions® lessons were written with a special focus on communication and social skills. These skills are embedded in each lesson throughout the curriculum and integrated into activities where students apply the needed skills. The lessons cover a wide range of topics all designed to prepare the student for post-secondary career, life, and personal experiences. Preparing for success in the work place and career realm is a key component of the Transitions® Curriculum.

A specific focus on communication and social skills can be found in Unit 1 of Career Management, with 18 lessons that concentrate on learning and practicing powerful communication skills on the job and in typical adult situations. This Unit has a particular concentration on anger management including understanding anger, recognizing physical responses to anger and practicing techniques for controlling anger. In Lesson 10, students learn to recognize their own physical responses to anger – often brought on by stress and anxiety when they are faced with situations they do not understand or by unexpected changes in the environment. This is only one example of how the curriculum serves to help students understand their anger response and the choices they have about channeling it.

For students with autism, the adult world can be puzzling and frightening when they are misunderstood or do not understand the social cues often take for granted by the vast majority. The Transitions® Curriculum will give these students powerful tools and strategies for their first successful steps into the adult community.

To learn more about the Transitions® Curriculum or to place an order click here! 

References:

American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. (2000). Text Revision: Washington DC, American Psychiatric Association.

Lee, Gloria K. & Carter, Erik W. (2012) Preparing transition-age students with high- functioning autism spectrum disorders for meaningful work. Psychology in the Schools, Vol. 49 (10).

Wing, L., & Gould, J. (1979). Severe impairments of social interaction and associated abnormalities in children: Epidemiology and classification. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (2001) – http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/index.html

National Research Council. (2001). Educating Children With Autism. – http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=10017

Transitions® is a registered trademark of the James Stanfield Company. Copyright 2013 James Stanfield Company. All Rights Reserved. 


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